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Want to start working in international development? Feb. 4th Deadline for GHFP Global Health Internships #USAID #internship

 

The application deadline for the Global Health Fellows Program’s summer 2011 internships is Friday, February 4, 2011. Openings are with the US Agency for International Development in the Agency’s Washington, DC headquarters and in Kampala, Uganda with USAID Mission partner organizations.

These internships are a unique opportunity to gain practical experience in the field of global health. You will work with experienced professionals on health projects of international importance. Technical areas include:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Infectious diseases (e.g. malaria, avian influenza, TB)
  • Maternal and child health
  • Reproductive health
  • Nutrition
  • Commodities and logistics

Detailed information, including an online application and instructions, is available on our website at www.ghfp.net. Applications are due by February 4, 2011.

A variety of competitive, paid positions at the graduate level are available. We are interested in people from a broad range of disciplines including:

  • Public health
  • Social work
  • Education
  • International relations/development
  • Commodity security and logistics
  • Medicine
  • Nursing /midwifery
  • Public policy
  • Pharmacy
  • Business administration
  • Law

All internships require US citizenship or permanent resident status.

GHFP’s summer 2011 internships in Washington, DC include:

Bureau for Global Health, Office of the Assistant Administrator
Highly Vulnerable Children Intern

Office of HIV/AIDS, Implementation Support Division
Orphans and other Vulnerable Children (OVC) Intern (potentially 2 hires)

Office of HIV/AIDS, Strategic Planning, Evaluation and Reporting Division
HIV/AIDS Monitoring and Evaluation Intern
HIV/AIDS Health Systems Strengthening Intern

Office of HIV/AIDS, Technical Leadership and Research Division
HIV/AIDS Nutrition Intern (potentially 2 hires)
HIV/AIDS Research Intern
HIV/AIDS Prevention Intern
(potentially 2 hires)
HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Intern
HIV/AIDS Community Care and Prevention Intern
HIV Testing and Counseling Intern
(potentially 2 hires)
HIV Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT)/Pediatric Intern

Office of Population and Reproductive Health, Policy, Evaluation & Communication Division
Demographic and Health Surveys Intern
Fistula and Postabortion Care Intern

Office of Population and Reproductive Health, Commodities Security and Logistics Division

Commodities Security & Logistics Intern

Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition, Infectious Diseases Division
Tuberculosis Program Intern

Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition, Nutrition Division
Health Research Analyst Intern

GHFP’s summer 2011 internships in Kampala, Uganda include:

The Meeting Point
Orphans and other Vulnerable Children (OVC) Intern (potentially 2 hires)

The AIDS Support Organization (TASO)
HIV Gender Based Violence Intern
HIV Home Based Care Intern
HIV Testing and Counseling Intern

Mengo Hospital
HIV Testing and Counseling Intern
HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Intern
Orphans and other Vulnerable Children (OVC) Intern

To learn more about the Global Health Fellows Program, please visit www.ghfp.net. To learn more about USAID, the largest government donor organization in the development field, please visit www.usaid.gov.
 

Posted via email from sue griffey's posterous

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