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Sue's Year in Review

Are you surprised to know that I am a dataviz-envier?

I don't consider myself very creative so I was happy, a couple years ago, to learn from Susan Kistler and Stephanie Evergreen (both then at AEA- the American Evaluation Association) about p2i-Potent Presentations. I finally made my own p2 for AEA 2013 and felt pretty good about how it turned out. [See It’s never too late – Just Do It (with apologies to Nike).]

 I follow all sorts of dataviz experts and expounders on multiple social media sites. I bookmark sites about choosing colors, "rules" for dataviz, and the like. And, occasionally, I look at links about making an infographic - but mostly I just look at all sorts of infographics.

At the end of 2013, when Stephanie Evergreen published her infographic Year in Review, I was so impressed - and envious.

And then the envy started again, when she published her 2014 annual report on December 23rd.

In the last few days of each year, I usually write a message to work colleagues about the year, and I use notes that I make during the year to summarize our progress. Even though I early-retired at the end of July, I thought I'd summarize my year to share in an email with a few colleagues and friends that I thought might be interested. As I sat down today to write, I decided instead to make an infographic to share.

HUGE thanks to Listen Data's free PowerPoint infographic templates which made it pretty easy for me to get this done in just a few hours.

So now I am sharing my own 2014 professional report and my experience creating it for other dataviz-enviers to try this too.



And my dataviz-envy is lessening just a bit now...

Happy new year!

Comments

  1. Nice infographic sue, suggesting you a visualizing tool called creately to draw your infographic faster as there are infographic templates available.

    ReplyDelete

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