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Attending EERS Eastern Eval Research Soc mtg. What's changed in evaluation-parallels to #mentoring: A 2-way street

Interesting conversation led by Dr. G. Grob about how we have seen evaluation change over the audience's years of practice.

This resonated with me and my interest in mentoring. A key change I have seen in evaluation is the opportunity for and interest in mentoring and capacity-building for those with whom we are conducting evaluations. This for me is the key to mentoring as well. It is no longer necessary to have a formal mentor-mentee relationship built on a joint agreement to work together for the mentee to achieve certain goals. Mentoring also benefits from the do-it-now-because-I-need-it-now perspective (also known as instant gratification!) that we all live in nowadays. Theory and research to build an evidence base are important in any discipline - including evaluation and mentoring - but these do not define the way these are practiced. They guide and provide insight, but practitioners make them come alive. If you haven't found a mentor or mentoring opportunity that you are seeking, you have the opportunity to assess whether you have been clear in your needs and goals. But you also have the opportunity to make sure the mentors with whom you are in contact are clearly able to explain to you how they can help you, over what period of time, and with what outcome.

Are you on a 2-way street?

Posted via email from sue griffey's posterous

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