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You oughta be in pictures - But remember that a head shot should be mostly head (See SueMentors.blogspot.com)

More and more of us are comfortable with an online professional presence that also includes a photo. And digital cameras make it easy now to get a pretty decent head shot to use in the various online professional websites you should be using.

Just make sure it’s a good one.

  • Most sites reduce your photo presence so a head shot should be of your head. Don’t worry about showing off your clothing or diplomas or awards behind you or on your desk. They detract from YOU.
  • Make sure the picture is clear and bright. A very dark picture is almost as bad as no picture at all.
  • Don’t crop a head shot from a much larger photo or it will be fuzzy in the cropped view (unless you have a very high-megapixel camera).
  • Update your head shot every few months. In LinkedIn, for example, that gets you listed in the weekly LinkedIn updates and reminds people you are around. This is especially useful if you follow another recommendation I make – to post answers to questions and comment on discussions in the groups you’ve joined.

And if you don’t yet have a photo posted, now’s the time….

Posted via email from sue griffey's posterous

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